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What You Should and Shouldn’t Put Into Your Vagina

Sex Ed

What You Should and Shouldn’t Put Into Your Vagina

Is putting food into one’s vagina (e.g. cucumbers, bananas) safe even if they have been washed?

This is a great question since putting things in a vagina can potentially mess with the vagina’s pH balance and irritate/injure the skin, which can then lead to various bacterial and yeast infections. The acidity in some foods used in sexual play is a common cause for these types of infections.

Solid foods like a cucumber and a banana (with peel intact) are safer as they are less likely to be pushed too far up to reach with a finger or hand or to be forgotten. However, even foods like these that have been washed and scrubbed clean still carry some bacteria, so you are never “completely safe” from potential infection.

Some people may use food or other household objects for sexual pleasure because they do not have access to or are embarrassed to purchase a sex toy. But with several terrific companies out there selling ethically-made, body-safe toys that you can purchase discretely online, the choice between overcoming some personal nervousness and a potential visit to the emergency room where you attempt to make up some story about how you “fell while preparing a salad” is easy to make.

For those who specifically enjoy “playing with produce” because it turns them or their partner on, acknowledge the potential risk, clean the item and check for any rough edges or anything that could tear or scratch, and put a condom (or two) on the cucumber!

Have a question on your mind related to sex? Send them in to editorial@simplysxy.com


Elizabeth is a Clinical Psychologist and psychotherapist in Washington State. She provides therapy and consultation to individuals and couples and is working to become an AASECT-certified Sex Therapist. Her primary interests are romantic and sexual relationships, sexual empowerment and education, the dynamics of communication, and reducing stigma around issues of sexuality and mental health. Get in touch with Elizabeth via email at drelizabethwatt@gmail.com.

Read the rest of her profile below.


Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock

Elizabeth Watt

Elizabeth is a Clinical Psychologist and psychotherapist in Washington State. She provides therapy and consultation to individuals and couples and is working to become an AASECT-certified Sex Therapist. Her primary interests are romantic and sexual relationships, sexual empowerment and education, the dynamics of communication, and reducing stigma around issues of sexuality and mental health.

Get in touch with Elizabeth via email at elizabethdwatt@gmail.com

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